[AST] Sims 2 / 3 Machinima Camera Tips

Sims 2 Camera Tips

Press Tab
Pressing ‘tab’ on your keyboard switches to cameraman view. Move the mouse to change direction and ‘E’ for up, ‘Q’ for down, ‘A’ for left, ‘D’ for right, ‘W’ for forward and ‘S’ for backward. ‘X’ and ‘Z’ are for zoom in and out. Cameraman view should be used most of the time for filming and photography. With this view stairs, trees, lights and other objects stay visible.

Save Positions
When you have a favourite camera shot press control and 4,5,6,7,8,or 9 to save it. You can then press that number at any time and the camera will return to that exact postion. You can also line up a tracking shot by postioning your camera and saving it as ‘4’ then moving it to ‘5’ (any number 4-9 will do) the camera will move between these postions.

Camera Hack
The default camera settings often do not cater for the smooth, slower movements and rotations that one’s creative visions require! Learn how to hack your camera files in the Camera Hack Sims2 Tutorial.

Sims 3 Camera Tips

Press Tab
Pressing ‘tab’ on your keyboard switches to cameraman view. Move the mouse to change direction and ‘E’ for up, ‘Q’ for down, ‘A’ for left, ‘D’ for right, ‘W’ for forward and ‘S’ for backward. ‘X’ and ‘Z’ are for zoom in and out. You can also use the scroll on your mouse to zoom in and out. Cameraman view should be used most of the time for filming and photography. With this view stairs, trees, lights and other objects stay visible.

Save Positions
When you have a favourite camera shot press control and 5,6,7 or 8 to save it. You can then press that number at any time and the camera will return to that exact postion. You can also line up a tracking shot by postioning your camera and saving it as ‘5’ then moving it to ‘6’ (any number 5-8 will do) the camera will move between these postions.

Camera Hack
The default camera settings in the sims 3 are more versatile than in the sims 2, but we can still hack them a little. Learn more in the Camera Hack Sims3 Tutorial.

General Tips

Angles
Camera angles can cleverly convey more information about your movie or story.

High Angle When the camera is looking down on the character/s. This can be used to make a character appear inferior, small or vulnerable.

Level shot The camera is level with the character/s. This is a neutral shot and is used most often – it’s good for dialogue and to make the viewer/reader feel comfortable with the characters.

Low Angle The camera looks up to the character/s. This can be used to make a character appear superior, large or powerful.

Shot
Shot sizes are useful to add to your plot or characterisation. Movies and stories should have a good variety of shot sizes to add interest for audiences.

Close-up The camera is close to a character or object. This is very useful to show a character’s expression, so that their mood can be clearly conveyed. It can also reveal an important detail in your setting, an object that may be crucial to your plot.

Mid Shot The camera is at a comfortable distance from the character’s, often with this shot we can see the character/s either in full or from the waist up. It is good for dialogue, when characters are communicating.

Long Shot The camera is a long way from the main character/s or set. This enables you to show a complete view of the setting, allowing viewers to see where the action is taking place.

Point of View The camera acts as the “eyes” of the character, we see what they see.

Camera Movement
This can be overused at times. In conventional movies the camera stays still for a majority of shots and movement is used to add drama, mystery or set a mood at particular points in the plot. Movement can also be good for transition between scenes. Some modern films and particularly television ‘cop’ or ‘hospital’ shows have used constant movement in an attempt to add constant drama. However overuse can mean that the effect is lost, and some viewers can even get motion sickness!

Zoom The camera zooms in to get a close-up of a character’s expression or a prop detail, the zoom adds to the tension. The camera might zoom out to reveal something else occurring in the set.

Pan The camera pans slowly revealing more of a large set.
Hand-held The camera is a little shaky to mimic the experience of a hand-held video camera.

Tracking The camera tracks along a particular ‘path’ to show a set or where a character is walking. The camera might also track the character so that viewers follow their movement.


Archived from the defunct A-Sims-Tale Movie-Making Wikia.

– “A Sims Tale” Forum has changed into – SimsDynamic
It’s a small community of sims machinima storytellers dedicated to quality art.